As anyone tried to open the devices?

It's a simple question... I'm tempted to try that, but maybe some one more adventurous than me have already do that...
Why? Curious. Also, can give us some inside about how this technology works. For example, i just shut off the base station, while holding it. The vibration felt it like if there were some motors moving something (the lights maybe?). And confirming that would give us some info on how it works, and maybe some ideas on how to make the multi-base config work....
Maybe, its just me being insane...

Comments

  • It use Sonar Motor and IR 
  • @Tux0TopoTaking it apart is not going to help you with that (and runs the risk of breaking it)! In order to use multiple base stations, firstly the base stations need some way to sync with each other (which these may or may not have, we don't know), and secondly the Nolo driver (and probably firmware) has to be updated to support that. There's absolutely nothing you can do to make it happen unless you write your own firmware and drivers for the Nolo hardware.
  • @Jazne That is some motor controlled by sonar. No sonar using the motor itself for working...

    @iVRy Hi!! I'm not a developer, so no coding skills here. But understanding the technology could give us ideas, and with good luck, the chance to sugest some decent ideas to de engineer/developer team at nolo.
    Why i'm saying these madness? well, back in 27 december 2016, undestanding a little abut the PolarTrack technology, i suggested to Lisa (by facebook) about the ceilling option. She passed it to the developer team. I'm the author of that idea? don't know/care, but till then they didn't try. Now is part of it. So, maybe some decent idea can be made...
  • @Tux0Topo ; That is something you can do! I meant "technically"... :wink:
  • @Tux0Topo, your idea about the ceiling was great!

    I haven't opened mine, but I can give you a good idea about how it works.  It's basically a Lighthouse (Vive) - lite.  Each tracker uses the same concept of sweeping orthogonal laser lines to get a 2D direction relative to the base-station.  The basestation also "chirps" at a regular interval in ultrasonic, which the trackers measure the time of flight of to get distance.  Couple distance and direction and you have polar coordinates, hence the name polartrak.  They only part I haven't figured out is how it times the start of each laser sweep and ultrasonic pulse.  My best guess is that it communicates via a radio signal to the controller.  I think this is is different than the vive lighthouse, which uses a (more reliable) LED flood light.   The controllers exclusively use an internal IMU for orientation.  Not sure if they have a magnetometer in them to avoid drift.  They can't get reliable orientation from just the ultrasonic and lasers (though some partial solution should be possible).  

    It's a good concept, but is challenging.  No one sensor provides all of the data.  Lighthouse tracking provides a full position and orientation with each 2-axis laser sweep because each of the the sensors on the controller/headset are separated spatially, which is why they are so big.  It's only a 30hz update rate (60hz using one base station) though, so it uses the 1000Hz IMU to fill in the gaps, giving you a 1ms update period.   The Nolo has to contend with 3 different sensors, each providing incomplete information at vastly different rates.  You get direction from the lasers, distance from the ultrasonic, orientation/acceleration from the IMU, and (I guess) timing from the radio.  Putting all of this together is very hard.  You contend with different update rates, different noise characteristics, different latencies, different interference.  It must be a mess.   

    In any case, it's all super-cheap tech that requires almost no intensive computing (e.g. vision processing).  Note, lighthouse tracking is very cheap too, just not small.  It's *insane* what they charge for it.  I'd be using it now if it were not > $500 for a lighthouse station, tracker, and 2 wands.   
  • Thanks!!!
    So, the leds seems to be motorized... just like in the Vive...
    I guess that they provide the angle and the sonar the distance... just like in the polar coordinate system....
    And because almost always, at least 2 set of sensors on the trackers detects signals, the system can be very precise...

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